Call Today: (562) 989-9835

Property Management Blog

Happy Father's Day

System - Thursday, June 14, 2018
We want to wish all the Fathers out there a beautiful weekend!

Article by History.com

The nation’s first Father’s Day was celebrated on June 19, 1910, in the state of Washington. However, it was not until 1972–58 years after President Woodrow Wilson made Mother’s Day official–that the day honoring fathers became a nationwide holiday in the United States. Father’s Day 2018 occurs on Sunday, June 17.

Mother’s Day: Inspiration for Father’s Day

The “Mother’s Day” we celebrate today has its origins in the peace-and-reconciliation campaigns of the post-Civil War era. During the 1860s, at the urging of activist Ann Reeves Jarvis, one divided West Virginia town celebrated “Mother’s Work Days” that brought together the mothers of Confederate and Union soldiers.

Did You Know?

There are more than 70 million fathers in the United States.

However, Mother’s Day did not become a commercial holiday until 1908, when–inspired by Jarvis’s daughter, Anna Jarvis, who wanted to honor her own mother by making Mother’s Day a national holiday–the John Wanamaker department store in Philadelphia sponsored a service dedicated to mothers in its auditorium.

Thanks in large part to this association with retailers, who saw great potential for profit in the holiday, Mother’s Day caught on right away. In 1909, 45 states observed the day, and in 1914, President Woodrow Wilson approved a resolution that made the second Sunday in May a holiday in honor of “that tender, gentle army, the mothers of America.”

Origins of Father’s Day

The campaign to celebrate the nation’s fathers did not meet with the same enthusiasm–perhaps because, as one florist explained, “fathers haven’t the same sentimental appeal that mothers have.”

On July 5, 1908, a West Virginia church sponsored the nation’s first event explicitly in honor of fathers, a Sunday sermon in memory of the 362 men who had died in the previous December’s explosions at the Fairmont Coal Company mines in Monongah, but it was a one-time commemoration and not an annual holiday.

The next year, a Spokane, Washington, woman named Sonora Smart Dodd, one of six children raised by a widower, tried to establish an official equivalent to Mother’s Day for male parents. She went to local churches, the YMCA, shopkeepers and government officials to drum up support for her idea, and she was successful: Washington State celebrated the nation’s first statewide Father’s Day on June 19, 1910.

Slowly, the holiday spread. In 1916, President Wilson honored the day by using telegraph signals to unfurl a flag in Spokane when he pressed a button in Washington, D.C. In 1924, President Calvin Coolidge urged state governments to observe Father’s Day.

Today, the day honoring fathers is celebrated in the United States on the third Sunday of June: Father’s Day 2017 occurs on June 18; the following year, Father’s Day 2018 falls on June 17.

In other countries–especially in Europe and Latin America–fathers are honored on St. Joseph’s Day, a traditional Catholic holiday that falls on March 19.

Father’s Day: Controversy and Commercialism

Many men, however, continued to disdain the day. As one historian writes, they “scoffed at the holiday’s sentimental attempts to domesticate manliness with flowers and gift-giving, or they derided the proliferation of such holidays as a commercial gimmick to sell more products–often paid for by the father himself.”

During the 1920s and 1930s, a movement arose to scrap Mother’s Day and Father’s Day altogether in favor of a single holiday, Parents’ Day. Every year on Mother’s Day, pro-Parents’ Day groups rallied in New York City’s Central Park–a public reminder, said Parents’ Day activist and radio performer Robert Spere, “that both parents should be loved and respected together.”

Paradoxically, however, the Great Depression derailed this effort to combine and de-commercialize the holidays. Struggling retailers and advertisers redoubled their efforts to make Father’s Day a “second Christmas” for men, promoting goods such as neckties, hats, socks, pipes and tobacco, golf clubs and other sporting goods, and greeting cards.

When World War II began, advertisers began to argue that celebrating Father’s Day was a way to honor American troops and support the war effort. By the end of the war, Father’s Day may not have been a federal holiday, but it was a national institution.

In 1972, in the middle of a hard-fought presidential re-election campaign, Richard Nixon signed a proclamation making Father’s Day a federal holiday at last. Today, economists estimate that Americans spend more than $1 billion each year on Father’s Day gifts.


Happy Memorial Day!

System - Sunday, May 27, 2018

Happy Mother's Day!

System - Friday, May 11, 2018

Article by History.com

Mother’s Day is a holiday honoring motherhood that is observed in different forms throughout the world, and Mother’s Day 2018 occurs on Sunday, May 13, in the United States. The American incarnation of Mother’s Day was created by Anna Jarvis in 1908 and became an official U.S. holiday in 1914. Jarvis would later denounce the holiday’s commercialization and spent the latter part of her life trying to remove it from the calendar. While dates and celebrations vary, Mother’s Day traditionally involves presenting moms with flowers, cards and other gifts.

History of Mother’s Day

Celebrations of mothers and motherhood can be traced back to the ancient Greeks and Romans, who held festivals in honor of the mother goddesses Rhea and Cybele, but the clearest modern precedent for Mother’s Day is the early Christian festival known as “Mothering Sunday.”

Once a major tradition in the United Kingdom and parts of Europe, this celebration fell on the fourth Sunday in Lent and was originally seen as a time when the faithful would return to their “mother church”—the main church in the vicinity of their home—for a special service.

Over time the Mothering Sunday tradition shifted into a more secular holiday, and children would present their mothers with flowers and other tokens of appreciation. This custom eventually faded in popularity before merging with the American Mother’s Day in the 1930s and 1940s.

Did You Know?

More phone calls are made on Mother’s Day than any other day of the year. These holiday chats with Mom often cause phone traffic to spike by as much as 37 percent.

Ann Reeves Jarvis and Julia Ward Howe

The origins of Mother’s Day as celebrated in the United States date back to the 19th century. In the years before the Civil War, Ann Reeves Jarvis of West Virginia helped start “Mothers’ Day Work Clubs” to teach local women how to properly care for their children.

These clubs later became a unifying force in a region of the country still divided over the Civil War. In 1868 Jarvis organized “Mothers’ Friendship Day,” at which mothers gathered with former Union and Confederate soldiers to promote reconciliation.

Another precursor to Mother’s Day came from the abolitionist and suffragette Julia Ward Howe. In 1870 Howe wrote the “Mother’s Day Proclamation,” a call to action that asked mothers to unite in promoting world peace. In 1873 Howe campaigned for a “Mother’s Peace Day” to be celebrated every June 2.

Other early Mother’s Day pioneers include Juliet Calhoun Blakely, a temperance activist who inspired a local Mother’s Day in Albion, Michigan, in the 1870s. The duo of Mary Towles Sasseen and Frank Hering, meanwhile, both worked to organize a Mothers’ Day in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some have even called Hering “the father of Mothers’ Day.”

Anna Jarvis

The official Mother’s Day holiday arose in the 1900s as a result of the efforts of Anna Jarvis, daughter of Ann Reeves Jarvis. Following her mother’s 1905 death, Anna Jarvis conceived of Mother’s Day as a way of honoring the sacrifices mothers made for their children.

After gaining financial backing from a Philadelphia department store owner named John Wanamaker, in May 1908 she organized the first official Mother’s Day celebration at a Methodist church in Grafton, West Virginia. That same day also saw thousands of people attend a Mother’s Day event at one of Wanamaker’s retail stores in Philadelphia.

Following the success of her first Mother’s Day, Jarvis—who remained unmarried and childless her whole life—resolved to see her holiday added to the national calendar. Arguing that American holidays were biased toward male achievements, she started a massive letter writing campaign to newspapers and prominent politicians urging the adoption of a special day honoring motherhood.

By 1912 many states, towns and churches had adopted Mother’s Day as an annual holiday, and Jarvis had established the Mother’s Day International Association to help promote her cause. Her persistence paid off in 1914 when President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day.

Jarvis Decries Commercialized Mother’s Day

Anna Jarvis had originally conceived of Mother’s Day as a day of personal celebration between mothers and families. Her version of the day involved wearing a white carnation as a badge and visiting one’s mother or attending church services. But once Mother’s Day became a national holiday, it was not long before florists, card companies and other merchants capitalized on its popularity.

While Jarvis had initially worked with the floral industry to help raise Mother’s Day’s profile, by 1920 she had become disgusted with how the holiday had been commercialized. She outwardly denounced the transformation and urged people to stop buying Mother’s Day flowers, cards and candies.

Jarvis eventually resorted to an open campaign against Mother’s Day profiteers, speaking out against confectioners, florists and even charities. She also launched countless lawsuits against groups that had used the name “Mother’s Day,” eventually spending most of her personal wealth in legal fees. By the time of her death in 1948 Jarvis had disowned the holiday altogether, and even actively lobbied the government to see it removed from the American calendar.

Mother’s Day Around the World

While versions of Mother’s Day are celebrated worldwide, traditions vary depending on the country. In Thailand, for example, Mother’s Day is always celebrated in August on the birthday of the current queen, Sirikit.

Another alternate observance of Mother’s Day can be found in Ethiopia, where families gather each fall to sing songs and eat a large feast as part of Antrosht, a multi-day celebration honoring motherhood.

In the United States, Mother’s Day continues to be celebrated by presenting mothers and other women with gifts and flowers, and it has become one of the biggest holidays for consumer spending. Families also celebrate by giving mothers a day off from activities like cooking or other household chores.

At times, Mother’s Day has also been a date for launching political or feminist causes. In 1968 Coretta Scott King, wife of Martin Luther King Jr., used Mother’s Day to host a march in support of underprivileged women and children. In the 1970s women’s groups also used the holiday as a time to highlight the need for equal rights and access to childcare.


All About Easter

System - Friday, March 30, 2018

Article by History.com

Easter is a Christian holiday that celebrates the belief in the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. In the New Testament of the Bible, the event is said to have occurred three days after Jesus was crucified by the Romans and died in roughly 30 A.D. The holiday concludes the “Passion of Christ,” a series of events and holidays that begins with Lent—a 40-day period of fasting, prayer and sacrifice—and ends with Holy Week, which includes Holy Thursday (the celebration of Jesus’ Last Supper with his 12 Apostles), Good Friday (on which Jesus’ death is observed), and Easter Sunday. Although a holiday of high religious significance in the Christian faith, many traditions associated with Easter date back to pre-Christian, pagan times. 

When Is Easter?

Easter 2018 occurs on Sunday, April 1. However, Easter falls on a different date each year.

Easter Sunday and related celebrations, such as Ash Wednesday and Palm Sunday, are considered “moveable feasts,” although, in western Christianity, which follows the Gregorian calendar, Easter always falls on a Sunday between March 22nd and April 25th.

In Eastern Orthodox Christianity, which adheres to the Julian calendar, Easter falls on a Sunday between April 4th and May 8th each year.

In some denominations of Protestant Christianity, Easter Sunday marks the beginning of Eastertide, or the Easter Season. Eastertide ends on the 50th day after Easter, which is known as Pentecost Sunday.

In Eastern Orthodox branches of Christianity, Easter Sunday serves as the start of the season of Pascha (Greek for “Easter”), which ends 40 days later with the holiday known as the Feast of the Ascension.

Despite its significance as a Christian holy day, many of the traditions and symbols that play a key role in Easter observances actually have roots in pagan celebrations—particularly the pagan goddess Eostre (or Ostara), the ancient Germanic goddess of spring—and in the Jewish holiday of Passover.

Religious Tradition of Easter

The resurrection of Jesus, as described in the New Testament of the Bible, is essentially the foundation upon which the Christian religions are built. Hence, Easter is a very significant date on the Christian calendar.

According to the New Testament, Jesus was arrested by the Roman authorities, essentially because he claimed to be the “Son of God,” although historians question this motive, with some saying that the Romans may have viewed him as a threat to the empire.

He was sentenced to death by Pontius Pilate, the Roman prefect in the province of Judea from 26 to 36 A.D. Jesus’ death by crucifixion, marked by the Christian holiday Good Friday (the Friday before Easter), and subsequent resurrection three days later is said, by the authors of the gospels, to prove that he was the living son of God.

In varying ways, all four of the gospels in the New Testament (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) state that those who believe in Jesus’ death and resurrection are given “the gift of eternal life,” meaning that those of faith will be welcomed into the “Kingdom of Heaven” upon their earthly death.

Passover and Easter

Notably, Easter is also associated with the Jewish holiday of Passover, as well as the exodus of the Jews from Egypt, as described in the Old Testament. These links are clearly seen in the Last Supper, which occurred the night before Jesus’ arrest and the sufferings Jesus endured following his arrest.

The Last Supper was essentially a Passover feast. However, the New Testament describes it as being given new significance by Jesus: He identified the matzah (or bread) he shared with his 12 apostles as his “body” and the cup of wine they drank as his “blood.”

These rituals would come to symbolize the sacrifice he was about to make in death, and became the basis for the Christian ritual of Holy Communion, which remains a fundamental part of Christian religious services.

As Jesus’ arrest and execution were said to have occurred during the Jewish observance of Passover, the Easter holiday is often close to the former celebration on the Judeo-Christian calendar.

Easter Traditions

In western Christianity, including Roman Catholicism and Protestant denominations, the period prior to Easter holds special significance.

This period of fasting and penitence is called Lent. It begins on Ash Wednesday, and lasts for 40 days (not including Sundays).

The Sunday immediately prior to Easter is called Palm Sunday, and it commemorates Jesus’ arrival in Jerusalem, when followers laid palm leaves across the road to greet him.

Many churches begin the Easter observance in the late hours of the day before (Holy Saturday) in a religious service called the Easter Vigil.

In Eastern Orthodox Christianity, Easter rituals start with the Great Lent, which begins on Clean Monday (40 days prior to Easter, not including Sundays). The last week of Great Lent is referred to as Palm Week, and it ends with Lazarus Saturday, the day before Palm Sunday.

Palm Sunday marks the beginning of Holy Week, which ends on Easter.

Easter Eggs

Irrespective of denomination, there are many Easter-time traditions with roots that can be traced to non-Christian and even pagan or non-religious celebrations. Many non-Christians choose to observe these traditions while essentially ignoring the religious aspects of the celebration.

Examples of non-religious Easter traditions include Easter eggs, and related games such as egg rolling and egg decorating.

It’s believed that eggs represented fertility and birth in certain pagan traditions that pre-date Christianity. Egg decorating may have become part of the Easter celebration in a nod to the religious significance of Easter, i.e., Jesus’ resurrection or re-birth.

Many people—mostly children—also participate in Easter egg “hunts,” in which decorated eggs are hidden.

Easter Bunny

In some households, a character known as the Easter Bunny delivers candy and chocolate eggs to children on Easter Sunday morning. These candies often arrive in an Easter basket.

The exact origins of the Easter Bunny tradition are unknown, although some historians believe it arrived in America with German immigrants in the 1700s. Rabbits are, in many cultures, known as enthusiastic procreators, so the arrival of baby bunnies in springtime meadows became associated with birth and renewal.

Notably, several Protestant Christian denominations, including Lutherans and Quakers, have opted to formally abandon many Easter traditions, deeming them too pagan. However, many religious observers of Easter also include them in their celebrations.

An Easter dinner of lamb also has historical roots, since a lamb was often used as a sacrificial animal in Jewish traditions, and lamb is frequently served during Passover. The phrase “lamb of God” is sometimes used to refer to Jesus and the sacrificial nature of his death.

Today, Easter is a commercial event as well as a religious holiday, marked by high sales for greeting cards, candies (such as Peeps, chocolate eggs and chocolate Easter bunnies) and other gifts.

Sources

McDougall, H. (2010). “The pagan roots of Easter.” TheGuardian.com.
Sifferlin, A. (2015). “What’s the origin of the Easter bunny?” Time.com.
Barooah, J. (2012). “Easter eggs: History, Origin, Symbolism and tradition.” Huffington Post.
Chapman, E. and Schreiber, S. (2018). “The history behind your favorite Easter traditions.” Goodhousekeeping.com.

What’s Coming To SoCal Theme Parks Year

System - Wednesday, March 14, 2018

One of the best things about living in Southern California is all of the amusement parks!  The following is an article that was posted on the CBS website written by Katie Bodell about what we have in store this year.

 

Southern California is a theme park hub. From family-friendly favorites to thrill capitols to animal-themed parks, we’ve pretty much got it all. And 2018 looks to be a banner year for SoCal theme parks. All six major SoCal theme parks will add attractions, shows, and new experiences this year. So grab your passes and get ready for an epic theme park adventure. Here’s what’s coming in 2018 to SoCal theme parks.

 

hangtime nighttime rendering1 Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

(Credit: Knotts Berry Farm)

Knott’s Berry Farm
8039 Beach Blvd.
Buena Park
(714) 220-5200
Knott’s Berry Farm is in for some exciting changes in 2018 starting with an all-new Knott’s PEANUTS Celebration taking place this January – February. The Celebration places Snoopy, Charlie Brown, and all of the beloved Peanuts characters front and center with new decorations, character experiences, photo opportunities, themed food and drinks, and new shows. In the Summer, Knott’s will debut a brand new steel roller coaster, HangTime, which will be the only dive coaster on the West Coast. Towering 150 feet over the updated Boardwalk area, the coaster will send riders along 2,189 feet of track, including up a vertical lift into a 15-story, 96 degree drop, the steepest in California.


hello kitty at universal studios hollywood 01 1 Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

Credit: Universal Studios

Universal Studios Hollywood
Universal City
(800) 864-8377
Two new attractions will hit Universal Studios in 2018, allowing fans of both DreamWorks and Hello Kitty to rejoice. DreamWorks Theatre will play host to DreamWorks-themed attractions through use of state-of-the-art projection mapping and LED lighting effects showcasing the Kung Fu Panda franchise upon release. Global pop icon Hello Kitty will also join Universal Studios this spring with an exclusive Animation Studio Store, as well as meet and greets with park guests.


gettyimages 517531324 Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

(credit: Jonathan Leibson/Getty Images for Samsung)

Six Flags Magic Mountain
Valencia
(661) 255-4100
The “Thrill Capital of the World” will add another dose of fun in 2018 when it debuts CraZanity, the world’s tallest pendulum ride, this spring. Standing 17 stories in the air, the giant disk ride will reach speeds of 75 miles-per-hour while swinging 40 riders back and forth over the newly-themed Boardwalk area. Six Flags also raised the bar with its schedule change for 2018, staying open 365 days/year instead of closing based on seasonal trends.


pixar pier Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

(Credit: The Walt Disney Company)

Disneyland California Resort
Disneyland & Disneyland California Adventure
Anaheim
(714) 781-4565
Disneyland and Disney California Adventure will debut a variety of new entertainment and attraction options in 2018 with its Pixar partnership coming to the park in all-new ways. The first-ever Pixar Fest, opening April 13, will celebrate everyone’s favorite Pixar pals with a new Pixar-themed fireworks spectacular, the return of two favorite parades (Paint the Night and the Pixar Play Parade), and Pixar-themed decor and entertainment. This summer, Pixar Pier will open as a new land in Disney California Adventure featuring four immersive Pixar-themed neighborhoods and an exciting new Incredicoaster, where guests will race to save baby Jack-Jack. Other additions to Disneyland this year include new sequences from “Star Wars: The Last Jedi” on Star Tours -The Adventures Continue as well as Disneyland After Dark, a series of specially-themed events inspired by the 50s and 60s at Disneyland Park.

electric eel launch station hi res Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

(Credit: SeaWorld Parks)

SeaWorld San Diego
San Diego
2018 is “fully charged” at SeaWorld San Diego, where a brand new, thrilling attraction, Electric Eel, will take park guests on a looping, twisting adventure starting this summer. The coaster, which boasts a 60mph launch and then 150-foot lift also features an inverted “heartline” roll and twisting loop offering the only upside down view of Mission Bay. Also new for the year, SeaWorld Inside Look gives unique behind-the-scenes glimpses about SeaWorld’s animal rescue team, offered weekends in January. Sesame Street Bay of Play will unfold into the rest of the park with an all-new Sesame Street Party Parade featuring themed floats and live music; the fun continues during Halloween for a Sesame Street Halloween Parade.


presser kristy 48 Whats Coming To SoCal Theme Parks This Winter & Spring 2018

(Credit: LEGOLAND California Resort)

LEGOLAND
Carlsbad
(877) 376-5346
2018 will be a year of enormous growth for LEGOLAND; this summer the park will showcase the largest investment at any LEGO park with LEGO City Deep Sea Adventure, an underwater adventure that highlights more than 2,000 real sea animals in a real submarine while exploring a sunken LEGO shipwreck. The park will also open a brand new hotel this spring, LEGOLAND Castle Hotel, a 250-room hotel with three fun themes: Knights and Dragons, Magic Wizard, and Royal Princess.

Katie Bodell is the Blog Editor for Trekaroo, the largest family travel website in the U.S. She is also a freelance writer, a happy wife to her best friend, and a mom to three sweet California girls. See more on: Trekaroo | CheapOair | Google+ | Twitter.

February Spotlight Property!

System - Thursday, February 15, 2018
This Stunning Luxury 1 Bedroom at The Villa Riviera!


This historic, iconic one bedroom, one bath corner unit that offers fusion of new and old. With spectacular city views, the Historic Villa Riviera sits on the beach & the crest of Downtown Long Beach with a walk about lifestyle full of many venues in which to partake. This unit has been tastefully remodeled to included newer bamboo flooring, a newly remodeled bath with walk in shower, modern subway tile & includes new lighting, bath fixtures & vanity. A stylish & efficient customized builtin-in home office area is located off the main living area. The kitchen was reworked with the original shaker style cabinets with all new stainless appliances, lighting & stunning black granite counters create a stylish but reminiscence feel to the galley kitchen that opens to the eating area with views of the city and ocean. For more information, or to schedule a viewing, please call or text Lorenzo at 562-822-2802, or visit us online at www.MyRentalList.com

First Friday Raffle!

System - Thursday, February 8, 2018
Every First Friday of the month Bixby Knolls businesses unite to promote local artists and musicians. From 6:30pm to 9:30 pm on both sides of Atlantic Ave tables/ booths are set up with amazing arts and crafts, yummy foods, etc. This month the theme of the night was Mardi Gras! E&H took full advantage of the theme! We passed out beads, cookies and of course information on our current available properties. We also raffled off a family fun night basket! Our winner was selected today.
Congratulations Malena!


Happy Birthday!

System - Monday, January 29, 2018
E&H would like to wish a Happy Birthday to Crystal & Paul!!


2017 Spark of Love Toy Drive!

System - Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Happy Thanksgiving!

System - Tuesday, November 21, 2017
Ernst & Haas wishes you and your loved ones a Happy Thanksgiving!


Please note that our office will be closed the following days in observance of Thanksgiving
Thursday, November 23rd - Closed
Friday, November 24th - Closed

Showing 1- 10 of 232

Office

4120 Atlantic Ave
Long Beach CA, 90807
Tel: (562) 989-9835
Office Fax: (562) 989-9166

BRE# 01251870

Office Hours

M-F 8:30 am – 5 pm
Saturday 9 am – 2 pm
Our office is closed on Sundays.

Copyright © 2018 Ernst & Haas Management Co, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Website built by PMW | Privacy Policy | Sitemap

Quick Contact